Many companies in Georgia, as in other states, have to struggle to balance safety concerns with being productive and making a profit. Now, an international study has found that companies that are older and have more employees can boost their chances of survival by as much as 56% by neglecting worker safety.

In other words, it’s more cost-effective for older, larger businesses to simply pay the fines for safety violations and deal with any workers’ compensation claims than to actually follow safety guidelines. Researchers discovered this trend after analyzing the survival of more than 100,000 Oregon-based organizations over a 25-year period.

They emphasize how larger businesses that actually have the resources to maintain safety can afford to neglect safety. Companies employing over 100 people that face workers’ comp claims are much more likely to survive than similar-sized companies that do not. However, companies with fewer than 30 employees see no similar advantages.

Researchers are unsure why facing workers’ comp claims would boost survival for larger companies. They do believe new regulations are needed that encourage business owners to find innovative ways to boost safety and productivity at the same time.

On-the-job injuries, whether or not they result from negligence on the employer’s or anyone’s part, are often the basis for workers’ compensation claims. Before filing one, victims may want a lawyer to assist them, especially if they need to mount an appeal. A successful claim may cover all medical expenses, a portion of lost wages and any disability-related leave.

Many lawyers use case managers rather than personally seeing and speaking with their clients. With Mr. Steven Morgan, though, clients can call at any time to receive one-on-one attention. Call today for a free consultation.